Wednesday, 28 October 2015

A fistful of love - wisdom and humour from a monk’s bowl - Book Review


After reading a few banal motivational books in succession, I was reluctant to read any book which offered any inspirational lesson or words of wisdom. That was the reason why didn’t have much hopes from But A fistful of love wisdom and humour from a monk’s bowl. But it pleasantly surprised me. I simply loved the book.

The book with the long name A fistful of love wisdom and humour from a monk’s bowl, is a collection of writings by the yogi Om Swami. These writings deal with variety of topics like relationships, peace of mind, love, money, purpose of human life, sex and spirituality. They contain anecdotes, some of which, rather many of which we have heard before.

Then too what makes the book interesting is the approach of the writer towards these issues. Neither does he condemn anything nor does he give heavy doses of morality. Whatever he speaks is direct and pragmatic. The sincerity in his voice is palpable.

He doesn’t say that by reading this book you will get a direct ticket to heaven. He says, “It’s impossible to only have agreeable conversations with your loved ones. It’s a given that there are going to be times when you or the other person will commit mistakes or you won’t be able to understand each other. It doesn’t mean that the relationship is not workable or that there is no compatibility between you two.

Borrowed quotes like “Put your mind in gear before you move your mouth. Never make a decision when you are angry and never make a promise when you are happy.” and cheeky lines like “The saddest part of a closed heart is that you only realize it was closed when it opens up. Attachment says you are mine and love says I am yours. Life is no fairy tale, but it’s not a horror story either. It’s neither comedy, nor tragedy, it’s just life. When someone hates you they only hate what they do not understand about you. The world is looking at you and trying to copy you thinking you have it all figured out nad you are doing the same looking at them,” make the book enjoyable.

That doesn’t meant that the book is free of any flaws. On page 139 of the book, in the famous story of the father, son and the donkey, at one place the donkey by an editorial miracle transforms into a monkey. Now as this book is a collection of write ups published earlier and comes from a prestigious publication, this mistake is unpardonable.

The author seems to have a strong influence of writings of Osho. His style is similar to that of the controversial, misunderstood Guru. But he is a milder version of Osho. I liked the way he differentiated between successful and successfool. I enjoyed this book and I am sure you will like it too.

No comments:

Post a Comment